Homeschool Path to College

Understanding transcripts, diplomas, college entrance exams and college applications.

Introduction

This guide will help you to help your homeschooled student as they prepare for college. Homeschooled students can go to college, receive scholarships and place well on entrance exams. Most colleges have a homeschool admissions track, to facilitate the many homeschoolers wishing to attend college each year.

Learning Communities students are considered homeschooled students

The Learning Communities program is, in essence, a non-accredited online homeschool support service. Students enroll in live webinar-based classes, submit assignments, take quizzes and a proctored final exam, all online.

Many colleges will accept a homeschool/non-accredited transcript

Transcripts can be created by the parents of the student, or administrator of a homeschool co-op. It is acceptable to submit multiple transcripts. In this case, a parent may create a transcript reflecting subjects studied independently, at home, during the high school years. In addition, Learning Communities high school students will also have a transcript reflecting courses completed through the Learning Communities program. Both transcripts, in addition to transcripts from other institutions, will be accepted by many college admissions departments.

Admission of homeschooled students without any transcript

Alternately, many homeschooled students are admitted to colleges each year without a transcript of any kind, accredited or non-accredited. Some colleges do not accept non-accredited transcripts, but do accept homeschooled students. The acceptance decision is based on a holistic review of the application, which includes a number of criteria, demonstrating a well rounded, diligent student who is ready for the college experience.

Learning Communities Transcripts and Grade Reports

A non-accredited grade report will be provided to each middle school student (grades 7-8), and a non-accredited transcript will be provided to each high school student (grades 9-12), reflecting courses completed, and grades earned.

Recommendations for Building Your Transcript

You may find it helpful to review Transcripts Made Easy by Janice Campbell

Good transcripts reflect the following:

  1. Minimum of 15 credits (though transcripts of less than 15 are accepted by college admissions)
  2. Variety of courses
  3. Courses spread over time (not all in one year)
  4. Good grades

Markers that admissions departments look for

In considering the whole application, it is helpful to demonstrate achievement in the following areas:

  1. Academic success
  2. Leadership
  3. Service
  4. Talent development
  5. Extra-curriculum activities
  6. A well rounded life

The High School Diploma

Most high school seniors are admitted to college before graduation from high school, and therefore don’t yet have a diploma. Some college applications ask if the student is on track to graduate at the end of the semester in which they are enrolled, at the time of their application. This is not typically a requirement, but does contribute to the overall admissions decision. Colleges are typically more interested in the student’s academic achievements rather than whether or not they have graduated from high school.

ACT and SAT Exams

Most colleges require a standardized exam for admissions, such as the ACT or SAT. This applies both to students who attended school or who were homeschooled.

These exams serve two purposes:

  1. Minimum admission criteria (unless applying to an “open enrollment” college, in which case there is no minimum score for admission)
  1. Placement

Exams are primarily focused on language arts and math. They are used to establish that the student can read, write and understand English, sufficient for college work.

Competency in Algebra 1 will assist a student in scoring well enough for admission at most colleges. Additional math competencies will increase the score, help with scholarships and provide a greater chance for admission. It is also helpful to be placed in a higher college math course.

ACT info can be found at act.org

The ACT exam can be taken in your local area by registering online for one of the dates that the exam is offered in your area.

Alternately, the “ACT Residual” exam is offered at more frequently time intervals, at most colleges, to meet the admission requirements of that particular college, without being transferable to any other college.

It is recommended that you prepare for the ACT by studying Princeton Review’s Cracking the ACT or by taking an ACT prep course.

SAT info can be found at collegeboard.org

The GED

This exam is required by some colleges, for homeschool applicants. Check with your college of choice to learn if it is required.

Info can be found at ged.com

A separate exam is administered for four subjects, as follows:

  • Math– Quantitative & algebraic problem solving
  • Science– Life science, physical science, earth and space science
  • Social Studies– Civics and government, U.S. history, economics, geography and the world
  • Reasoning Through Language Arts– Ability to read closely, write clearly, and edit and understand written text

Each test is a different length:

  • Math- 115 minutes
  • Science- 90 minutes
  • Social Studies- 70 minutes
  • Reasoning Through Language Arts- 150 minutes

Please search online for the cost of taking the GED in your state.

The cost for taking the GED in Utah:

  • Pay for one subject at a time
  • $20 per subject
  • Retake your test at a discount if you don’t pass

Passing score 145 (You will receive your score within 3 hours)

200 per subject = maximum score.

Minimum age to test in Utah = 18 if their age mates have graduated. (Special exceptions for ages 16-18 – check with Utah State Dept of Ed.)

It is recommend that students take the test to find out if more study is needed. Study materials are available.

Practice test: $24

Prep materials: $30 – $114 (Depending on the level of service)

Scholarships

Scholarships are not just for students with accredited transcripts. Many homeschooled students receive scholarships. Seek information from the financial aid office of the college of your choice to assist you in identifying scholarships that will accept homeschooled applicants. You may also find private scholarships online.

BYU Provo

BYU’s special requirement: an ecclesiastical endorsement, which is required annually

Seminary graduation is highly encouraged but not required. Having served a mission takes the place of seminary graduation.

More emphasis is placed on the ACT or SAT for homeschoolers. The average ACT score for new students for the 2017-2018 school year is = 29. The average SAT core is = 1280. It is recommended that homeschooled students achieve at east this average score.

The GED is not required for homeschoolers, if they are age 18 at the time of entrance, and if they have met their state’s requirements for high school. The application asks if the student has met the state’s requirements, and that box can be checked if those subjects have been covered at home. This is on the honor system.

BYU Idaho

BYU’s special requirement: an ecclesiastical endorsement, which is required annually

Seminary graduation is highly encouraged but not required. Having served a mission takes the place of seminary graduation.

All homeschooled students are required to take the GED or a high school equivalency exam offered by your state, unless you have a transcript from an accredited school showing that you have met your state’s requirements for high school. The application contains a check-box asking the student to indicate if they have completed the secondary school as requirements of their state. This can only be checked it they have a transcript from an accredited school. (Note that this is not on the honor system as BYU Provo uses.)

The ACT or SAT is required.  The minimum ACT score for admission = 16

BYU Idaho has a 99% admission rate, so chances are pretty good that you will be admitted! They admit many homeschoolers.

The student essay asks for achievements. You may include service, leadership, employment, noteworthy accomplishments, and activities you participated in, such as sports or music.

Students are asked to write what leadership means to them, and how they helped their family or community.

Specific items they look for are:

A time they took a risk, or overcame a set back

Why they want to attend

What they are passionate about

Any other item they want to share, such as skills, experiences, and talents

LDS Business College: An Open Enrollment College

The GED is required for homeschoolers, but not the ACT or the SAT

An ecclesiastical endorsement is required

Associates Degree Only – 60 credits

BYU Provo takes some classes in the general ed category, such as English, History, Math, etc. but not the business classes.

Most students are 18-30 year olds

BYU Salt Lake Center

No degree is offered

Credit may be earned for classes and may be transferred to any of the BYUs.

The simple application is really a “clearance for enrollment” which takes 10 minutes.

An ecclesiastical endorsement is required.

No tests are required (No GED, ACT or SAT).

If a homeschooler wishes to attend prior to age 18, they are accepted on a case by case, by speaking to an academic advisor. There is no minimum age.

24 credits may be earned at the BYU Salt Lake Center in order to be a transfer student for BYU Provo admissions, which means that no high school records are needed for entry into BYU Provo.

Same tuition as BYU Provo

Most students in 18-30 age range

Smaller class sizes.

Other Open Enrollment Schools in Utah

Open enrollment schools have no minimum ACT score requirement. These schools have strong LDS Institute programs and are recommended here for LDS students.

  • Utah Valley University (in Orem, UT)
  • Snow College (in Ephraim and Richfield, UT)

Community colleges are also typically open enrollment

Utah’s Secondary School Requirements

Check your own state for requirements. These are helpful in comparing your homeschool program, if you are required to meet these standards in a college admissions scenario.

Students in grades 9-12 shall earn a minimum of 24 units of credit through course completion, or through competency assessment, to graduate.

Grades 9-12 Core Curriculum credits from courses approved by the Board, as specified:

English/Language Arts (4 Credits)

Mathematics (3 Credits):

  • Successful completion of Secondary Mathematics I, II, and III or higher.
  • Parents may request that students replace Secondary III with a course from the Applied or Advanced approved course list.
  • Students who successfully complete Calculus have met graduation requirements regardless of the number of credits they have taken.

Science (3 Credits):

  • 2 Credits (from the four science foundation areas; Earth Systems, Biological Science, Chemistry, AP Computer Science, or Physics).
  • 1 Credit (from the foundation courses or the applied or advanced science core list).

Social Studies (3 Credits):

  • 1 Credit (U.S. History)
  • 0.5 Credit (Geography)
  • 0.5 Credit (Civilization)
  • 0.5 Credit (U.S. Government and Citizenship)
  • 0.5 Credit (LEA Discretion)

Directed Coursework (3.5 Credits):

  • 0.5 Credit (Fine Arts)
  • 1 Credit (CTE)
  • 0.5 Credit (Computer Technology)
  • 0.5 General Financial Literacy

Physical Education Health (2 Credits):

  • 0.5 Credit (Health)
  • 0.5 Credit (Participation Skills)
  • 0.5 Credit (Fitness for Life)
  • 0.5 Credit (Individualized Lifetime Activities)
  • Optional: 0.5 Credit Maximum (Team Sport/Athletic Participation*)
    * Can be used in place of Participation Skills or Individualized Lifetime Activities only.

Required Electives (5.5 Credits)

Total Credit Hours (24)

To view the Utah State Graduation Requirements online, visit School.utah.gov

Click on “Departments” then click on “A-Z Index”

Click on “G” and select Graduation Requirements, see left menu

Click on “Education Requirements”, select High School

 

Criteria to Consider when Selecting a College

Credibility and Quality: which is preferred?

Ivy League University

Private University

State College

Community College

LDS vs secular or general Christian perspective

Cost/scholarships

Availability of LDS students as possible marriage companions

Proximity to home

Access to LDS Institute

Strength of the core curriculum

Strength of the major program of your choice

Preparing for the specific career that the student wishes to pursue, Class size

Research University or more teaching focused (BYU Provo vs BYU Idaho)

Is a trade school or apprenticeship a better path?